READ: 23 Things they don’t tell you about Capitalism

Posted: September 5, 2019 in Economics, Geo Politics, Poverty
Tags: , , , ,

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Please make use of my copy of this text, my highlights are included in this version

In order to counter the prevailing narrative all too often forced upon us, Joon Chang does a valid job of presenting his research and evidencing his take on the alternative consequences of this form of ‘neo liberal’ capitalism. This form of market based trade varies from those of historical applications, and as the author shows, these do not transport well across borders.

The key points that I would like to make note of are as follows;

  • The prevalence of limited liability which ties into what I have read of other commentators, who raise legitimate concerns around the level of risk taking that this encourages and the fact that it is the shareholders who stand to loose their entire investment. The historical structure was one of full exposure to the risk of the venture ensuring that incentives of management match that of the investor

• I would like to draw attention to the assertion that ‘there is no such thing as a free market’ and that ‘economics is not a science but a political excercise’. This further raises the question as to why it is taught so prevalently in high schools ?

• Free market for labour? No, the biggest control in place here is immigration!

• The developed world benefits greatly from historical legacies and development which has taken place over centuries – this points directly to colonialism in my view – no observer should discount the impact the modern world structure has had on wealth and continued productivity

  • Change (economic development) and Value must be put into perspective, who is giving it value and is it of value to everyone?

• The way in which nations are assessed in terms of quality of life or economic indicators leaves a lot to be desired, if qualitative factors such as prison populations, income inequality, not too mention debt levels were factored in to this argument, the perspective would change quite significantly

• Perhaps most importantly for me; the impact of colonialism has not been deeply considered when trying to understand ‘modern world’ problems. After all, a number of Eurocentric commentators like to applaud Europe’s ‘contribution’ to the making of this contemporary world, how it was shaped (literally, with a blood soaked sword) by the West, but in this process of this construction why are we failing to appreciate the ongoing impact of over 400 years of systematic, comprehensive oppression, population upheaval and geographical reconstruction. Why?

 

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