Archive for the ‘Paper money’ Category

We have just passed yet another general election cycle where voters had to decide which lies they believed the most

As the purse strings are loosened in order to bribe voters there has been comment on the rising levels of public spending and the impact this will have on total borrowing, resulting in greater national debt.

Should it be needed to remind us, this raises the fundamental debate of justice at the heart of government spending plans. The cutting or expanding of public services are touted as the principle factors for how effectively a nation manages it national debt

If debt reaches proportions which are too high, service cuts are said to be the main remedy in restoring market confidence and being able to pay down total debt. This is the same sentiment used by the IMF when it looks to safeguard it foreign loans by insisting on public spending restrictions

Perhaps Ahmed Thompson articulated the deceit best in the tweet captured below

The greatest threat to debt levels have always been compound interest payments due to reckless borrowing in the first place. This compounding cannot be managed or paid off, but it can be written off by those who artificially created it in the first place

And therein lies the rub….we choose to cut spending for the most humane causes which will make no impact on the compounding interest built up but are utterly unmoved by the choice to retain financial commitments which exist on paper yet cause real world suffering. The choice is made to cause hardship in the name of keeping the monetary system afloat in the fallacy that it would cause a much greater impact if it were to sink….how can we loose something that was never real in the first place

The financial crises was an example of choosing not to let confidence (which is manipulated) drain away by signing blank cheques for quantities never heard of, yet the cutting of essential services to the vulnerable was fair game.

Please read this article by MoneyWeek on the recent raising of the US debt ceiling….it continues to shatter the perception that the US is the most economically prosperous nation with a healthy growth rate

The US has just voted to blow its budget

https://www.rt.com/shows/renegade-inc/379579-uk-finance-curse-suffer/

 

Is RT just a mouth piece for Russian imperialism….maybe, but doesn’t the great USA have mouth pieces and sensationalists such as Fox, and perhaps others media? Let us critically judge the content for what its worth.

From one of the Authors of ‘The Princes of the Yen’, view Professor Werner explain the workings of banking, but also justify some of the solutions to the issues it creates.

Many of these are scorned upon by neo liberals, often being rubbished by talk of the lack of competitiveness it would create, the lack of wealth for society as a whole….blah blah…haven’t we heard these arguments before, circulate again and again…but what haven’t we heard? How about the lack of manipulation, how about real democratic authority and accountability. What of fair pricing and transparency as opposed to superficial gains and over valued delusional self worth?

I must draw your attention to David Buik, ‘City Grandee’ of over 50 odd years experience of the city, frequently on mainstream business media, yet he didn’t even know how the City of London Corporation actually worked?? I would continue to question who these prominent experts are and what they actually know before we have them paraded in front of us as knowledgeable advisers and commentators

 

MoneyWeek always does a good job in joining together different strands of the reality surrounding debt and putting it all into perspective.

This piece is another example of such work, I found the following points worth noting;

• The effect cheap debt has on corporate behaviour, which in turn translates into market moves/signals

• Statistics in the shape of national debt being measured against GDP which is not entirely genuine due to the whole economy not being ‘owned’ by government . However this leads me to ponder that although government debt is initated by the State, it is all tax paying citizens that will ultimately bear its burden, hence comparing it to GDP does equate to it being the nations debt, but of course not all GDP belongs to all citizens

• How much debt is responsible for living standards. This is particularly worth contemplating, many look at material wealth and standards of living as a barometer for social advancement however if this is heavily influenced by credit and in some cases unaffordable credit, is it simply an illusion? Another house of cards, which others are vying endlessly to win a share of?

https://www.capitalandconflict.com/uncategorised/debt-solves-everything-hopefully/

For anyone not familiar with the work of Ann Pettifor – one of the few to correctly call the coming of the financial crisis a number of years prior to it arriving, and one of the main proponents of the Jubilee 2000 campaign which cancelled a portion of third world debt – please search for her various articles, lectures and opinions online.

Associated with Keynesian economics and the Labour party, her views may be dismissed by some, however upon closer inspection, I was interested in her view on the creation of money, and what this meant for resolving the debt and economic problems facing the developing world.

She is principally part of the PRIME think tank/research group, which has a number of papers on its site proving an alternative voice on economic issues

The above lecture at the LSE discusses her latest book, ‘The Production of Money: How to Break the Power of Bankers’, and gives an insight into her theories.

What I wish to highlight, are the following;

  • The issue of commodity money, and how scarce resources should not be used as a basis of any monetary system
  • The recognition that a fiat monetary system, can and should be used for the benefit of the population – outside the control of private banks, but in the knowledge that an entirely man-made system should be used to achieve a level of prosperity in all societies
  • There are certainly many socialist aspects to these beliefs, such as exerting capital controls and spending money into existence in terms of health, education and social expenditure thus increasing national debt, however interest ideally should not be necessary when such a system is implemented
  • There are some similarities with what Positive Money are advocating, but it seems there are specific differences, as this discussion points out…

 

 

https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/fractional-reserve-banking-tut/v/overview-of-fractional-reserve-banking

This praiseworthy organisation is known for providing free, all accessible learning for everyone on a range of core topics.

It does a sterling job of condensing hard to understand subjects, into bite size, digestible knowledge

Few areas have escaped its coverage, and I was fascinated to discover a number of sessions on Banking and Money.

The attached video is one of a three part series explaining how money is created by the private banks, something most people still know little about. This touches many key areas such explaining what Money is, how it actually works and raising valid questions about alternatives.

It doesn’t stop there, you can search for further tutorials on more how banks work, and again how they create money, as well as other technical aspects of the money supply, to name one example.

Its always good to see those of understanding laying bare these facts in a plain manner demonstrating just how easy it is to lift the veil which seems to cover these elements of a modern economy.

One argument which is used to discredit any realistic attempt to return to a gold standard in todays environment of ever expanding money supply, is that currently there is too much money in the system and too little gold to be able to adequately replace one for the other.

Well, Jim Rickards has one answer for us to consider…..

It is true that at today’s price of about $1,300 an ounce, if you had to scale down the money supply to equal the physical gold times 1,300 that would be a great reduction of the money supply.

That would indeed lead to deflation. But to avoid that, all we have to do is increase the gold price. In other words, take the amount of existing gold, place it at, say, $10,000 dollars an ounce, and there’s plenty of gold to support the money supply.

The limiting factor here is not the commodity….but the price itself.

Basic supply and demand economics and its impact on price…..don’t let so-called experts make simple concepts seem impossible. We can’t change the quantity, so change the price! Guess that means the market does not give us a correct price signal in view of this?

I’ve done that calculation, and it’s fairly simple. It’s not complicated mathematics