Archive for the ‘Poverty’ Category

We have just passed yet another general election cycle where voters had to decide which lies they believed the most

As the purse strings are loosened in order to bribe voters there has been comment on the rising levels of public spending and the impact this will have on total borrowing, resulting in greater national debt.

Should it be needed to remind us, this raises the fundamental debate of justice at the heart of government spending plans. The cutting or expanding of public services are touted as the principle factors for how effectively a nation manages it national debt

If debt reaches proportions which are too high, service cuts are said to be the main remedy in restoring market confidence and being able to pay down total debt. This is the same sentiment used by the IMF when it looks to safeguard it foreign loans by insisting on public spending restrictions

Perhaps Ahmed Thompson articulated the deceit best in the tweet captured below

The greatest threat to debt levels have always been compound interest payments due to reckless borrowing in the first place. This compounding cannot be managed or paid off, but it can be written off by those who artificially created it in the first place

And therein lies the rub….we choose to cut spending for the most humane causes which will make no impact on the compounding interest built up but are utterly unmoved by the choice to retain financial commitments which exist on paper yet cause real world suffering. The choice is made to cause hardship in the name of keeping the monetary system afloat in the fallacy that it would cause a much greater impact if it were to sink….how can we loose something that was never real in the first place

The financial crises was an example of choosing not to let confidence (which is manipulated) drain away by signing blank cheques for quantities never heard of, yet the cutting of essential services to the vulnerable was fair game.

Can trade not be organised in any other way – has it not been so in history? The underpinning of this economic system in exploitation and the shedding of blood is a truth that cannot be avoided. Does money make us happy or ignorant, is this what changes the world, or what qualities have changed the world?

What if we are unable to value those elements most crucial to our survival? What is the benefit in resource allocation via capitalism then?

Image result for 23 things they don't tell you about capitalism

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Please make use of my copy of this text, my highlights are included in this version

In order to counter the prevailing narrative all too often forced upon us, Joon Chang does a valid job of presenting his research and evidencing his take on the alternative consequences of this form of ‘neo liberal’ capitalism. This form of market based trade varies from those of historical applications, and as the author shows, these do not transport well across borders.

The key points that I would like to make note of are as follows;

  • The prevalence of limited liability which ties into what I have read of other commentators, who raise legitimate concerns around the level of risk taking that this encourages and the fact that it is the shareholders who stand to loose their entire investment. The historical structure was one of full exposure to the risk of the venture ensuring that incentives of management match that of the investor

• I would like to draw attention to the assertion that ‘there is no such thing as a free market’ and that ‘economics is not a science but a political excercise’. This further raises the question as to why it is taught so prevalently in high schools ?

• Free market for labour? No, the biggest control in place here is immigration!

• The developed world benefits greatly from historical legacies and development which has taken place over centuries – this points directly to colonialism in my view – no observer should discount the impact the modern world structure has had on wealth and continued productivity

  • Change (economic development) and Value must be put into perspective, who is giving it value and is it of value to everyone?

• The way in which nations are assessed in terms of quality of life or economic indicators leaves a lot to be desired, if qualitative factors such as prison populations, income inequality, not too mention debt levels were factored in to this argument, the perspective would change quite significantly

• Perhaps most importantly for me; the impact of colonialism has not been deeply considered when trying to understand ‘modern world’ problems. After all, a number of Eurocentric commentators like to applaud Europe’s ‘contribution’ to the making of this contemporary world, how it was shaped (literally, with a blood soaked sword) by the West, but in this process of this construction why are we failing to appreciate the ongoing impact of over 400 years of systematic, comprehensive oppression, population upheaval and geographical reconstruction. Why?

 

Please read this article by MoneyWeek on the recent raising of the US debt ceiling….it continues to shatter the perception that the US is the most economically prosperous nation with a healthy growth rate

The US has just voted to blow its budget

“None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free.” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe A cliché, and yet so pertinent. So many people think that the struggle against the New World Order is about preventing becoming their slaves. But we ARE their slaves! The essence of Slavery is that someone else […]

via From Chattel Slavery To Capitalism — Real Currencies

 

https://topdocumentaryfilms.com/escape-cult-materialism/

An exploration of our pervasive culture of consumption.

I noted the following well made points illustrated in this piece;

• The materialist dream is not practically possible for all humanity, therefore this will always necessitate leaving large parts of the world behind, keeping them poor and chasing an impossible reality. This level of inequality is inbuilt, and intentional. It is the modus operandi of consumerism

• Violence and warfare are integral aspects of this cult. In order to secure power, competitive advantage and gain access to markets for supply and demand components, an active military is fundamental

• When attempting to find linkage between different facts and truths in order to uncover the greater truths, one part of this documentary was particularly appealing. View from 34:16;

“Wasteful inefficiency, broken social system, toxic pollution, drug addiction, perpetual violence, misery….”