Too good not to share….you would think the public at large would notice something that big….guess not

There is only us people here…

Posted: February 14, 2017 in Monetary System
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There are no such things as ‘Corporations’. These entities only exist on paper in legal form, in reality, companies are just people some of whom fulfill multiple functions; employees, customers, shareholders. Some customers are employees. Some are both that and shareholders….where are the incentives and who are the ultimate beneficiaries therefore? If you fine a company, or tax it, the customers and the employees are the ones that foot the bill.

There are no such things as ‘The State’. They are just legal entities, sometimes, not always, bound together by another legally binding piece of paper, called a constitution, but who are the governments, the police and the army…they are same people who pay taxes, vote and follow the law? If a government takes on debt, it’s the citizens who pay it off.

Any institution is made up of only people. Behind the logo, behind the image and the advertisements and the facade…there are only people

And what of ‘The Market’….no it is not some miraculous spirit, beyond the flaws of human behaviour….it is made up of irrational humans itself, subject to whims like anything else, sometimes herd mentality will run supreme, other times we may get genuine independent movement, however let us not be fooled that it is not subject to manipulation and power plays, just like any other area of human activity.

But here’s a preview: it comes down to the fact that the people “in charge” of the economy fundamentally misunderstand it. We call it the machine metaphor: thinking of the economy as a machine with levers and pedals and gauges that can be operated to make it run faster. Of course the economy isn’t. It’s much closer to a natural ecosystem, made up of the free decision-making of millions of people.

In the machine economy, you become a cog. The state becomes the operator. It’ll pull whatever levers it can to try and make the machine run the way it wants. If that destroys a cog, so be it – the machine itself is more important.

Nick O’Connor, MoneyWeek

Prices change expectations (or perhaps “beliefs” is a better word), which change behaviour. Behaviour changes prices, which change expectations/beliefs. On and on it goes.

John Stepek, MoneyWeek

These are all examples of constructs; created structures that man builds and then becomes oppressed by. Invisible to the eye yet all encompassing, let us not be fooled in believing in apparitions….. some people think that is what ‘religion’ is for.

Who are the clergy, the establishment, the monarchs…..they are just people too. The consume, defecate, procreate and expire

Do not fear that which we create and build with out own hands and minds.

One argument which is used to discredit any realistic attempt to return to a gold standard in todays environment of ever expanding money supply, is that currently there is too much money in the system and too little gold to be able to adequately replace one for the other.

Well, Jim Rickards has one answer for us to consider…..

It is true that at today’s price of about $1,300 an ounce, if you had to scale down the money supply to equal the physical gold times 1,300 that would be a great reduction of the money supply.

That would indeed lead to deflation. But to avoid that, all we have to do is increase the gold price. In other words, take the amount of existing gold, place it at, say, $10,000 dollars an ounce, and there’s plenty of gold to support the money supply.

The limiting factor here is not the commodity….but the price itself.

Basic supply and demand economics and its impact on price…..don’t let so-called experts make simple concepts seem impossible. We can’t change the quantity, so change the price! Guess that means the market does not give us a correct price signal in view of this?

I’ve done that calculation, and it’s fairly simple. It’s not complicated mathematics

A Fascinating and extremely pertinent view expressed by MoneyWeek in the following article

A question which has certainly been raised in discussions about the nature and indeed, the durability, of this cryptocurrency, one must decide whether this trend will fall victim to many of the faults of other fiat currencies or does it take of the allure of precious commodities which can potentially outlast humanity itself?

On the surface I cannot think of Bitcoin as anything other than pseudo-fiat, however we may never even know the authority behind it, even if it is everyone of those that use it – can we not fall victim to the same whims of the State? Any man made invention will have its deep flaws and cannot be assumed to be beyond manipulation.

However, I understand the commodity like nature of it too, but as Buffet once remarked about gold, you certainly cannot eat bitcoin, you can’t even touch it, so how much of a commodity can we really think of it as?

..if someone were to hack the algorithm behind a bitcoin, that might have the same effect as a central bank printing money: it could lead to a loss of faith and value. Now there’s an irony! Central bankers are to fiat currencies what hackers are to cryptocurrencies!

My research will continue….

An article from the 2008 economic crises written by the two scholars above makes for worthy reading.

I see it as evidence of calling the bluff of practitioners who dabble in nothing more than conventional finance twisted to fool millions who are easily swayed by superficiality

Boom, Bust, Crunch..

Platforms are rarely provided to scholars who wish to take one step back and question some of the fundamental concepts that are being applied. Few questions are raised regarding the validity of Islamic debt financing, limited liability structures, speculative methods of market trading, or the nature of the monetary system. Such matters are given little attention in the headlong rush to copy interest-based methodologies and this has resulted in a number of embarrassing paradoxes

Poor countries don’t need charity. They need justice.

Is this another deception with our perception of ‘The World’?

One of the most comprehensive reports into the real financial transfers into and out of the developing world shows that the extraction of wealth from the third world, much of it former colonies, continues apace.

Rich countries aren’t developing poor countries; poor countries are developing rich ones

How Poor Countries Develop Rich Countries

I find the fact that some $4trillion since 1980 is attributed to debt interest repayments fascinating. The scale of this particular transfer is testament to the continued servitude of many nations states.

When many times more is sent back in exchange for every dollar received in aid, does this not sound like a familiar profit making enterprise at work?

Reading the original report, I find this sentence especially on point…

Much improved statistical compilation and reporting is required in order to have a more adequate picture of global financial flows; a task that urgently needs to be undertaken collaboratively by the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, United Nations, Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Bank for International Settlements.

Is this a list of the usual suspect organisations?

 

This past week, the London School of Economics, hosted an event on the Nature of Money, see details here.

One of the speakers was Dr Waltraud Schelkle, part of the LSE, an Associate Professor of Political Economy.

Please play the audio from time stamp 52.05 for a question put to the panel regarding the fraudulent aspects of the system. Dr Schelkle answers that she disagrees that the system is indeed based on deceit and she points to the ‘success’ of the Capitalist nations….

I think Susan Steed, another panellist, does an excellent job of refuting her shallow argument, without mentioning by name what I think is most key when understanding how the rich became rich…the Transatlantic Slave Trade…

I would also point the Dr to the numerous posts examining this on this blog, and will make an effort to highlight other key counterarguments in future

Fortuitously, this week I received a post from MoneyWeek entitled…”A 92bn Scam

It went on to state;

The $92 billion was income generated on the Federal Reserve’s portfolio of US government bonds. It bought vast numbers of these bonds by expanding its balance sheet and printing money. The government then paid interest on those bonds. That interest is the Federal Reserve’s return. That return is then passed back to the government as an important source of income.

To be clear, this is the state creating money from nothing… to lend to itself… to then pay interest on… and then use that interest as another source of revenue. That’s Deep State financial policy.

Misrepresenting transactions, making it seem as though the government is solvent when it is using a glorified Ponzi scheme…..that’s Fraud in my book.